Thought-Provoking Fiction


A new YA (Young Adult) novel models the four ‘money personalities’ to help teenagers identify their attitude to money, become financially literate, and develop better monetary habits.

According to the Australian Bureau of Statistics, Australia’s household debt is among the highest in the world but financial literacy is not improving. The implications for young people, who tend to repeat their parents’ money habits, are troubling.

‘With life skills still not being taught in Australian schools as an official subject, and only intentionally taught in some families, most young people are left to unconsciously perpetuate family habits when it comes to saving, spending and investing,’ says Melbourne author Liliane Grace.

Does life imitate art? Singer/actress Miley Cyrus is famous for her role as fictional pop star Hannah Montana, a sitcom that gave rise to her own singing career.

In 2016 Melbourne author and writing coach, Liliane Grace, was teaching a course on Novel-Writing at the Council of Adult Education when she decided to join her students in writing a novel, and dusted off an idea that had been waiting in her filing cabinet for some eight years. She finished writing the novel, a romance called Wanted: Greener Grass, in November 2015, and a week later a new man turned up in her own life.

What happens when your marriage is on the rocks and suddenly everything changes? Melbourne author Liliane Grace is launching a new novel, Wanted: Greener Grass in which her main character Mia finds out what happens when her husband John returns home from an overseas trip and promises more fun and romance in their marriage. Her thoughts of leaving abate and she relaxes into a more fulfilling marriage… until a few misplaced details bring this house of cards down.

Revealing more now will destroy the reader’s experience of this novel, but even if you guess the twist you will be surprised by the ending.

“Move over Harry there’s a new wizard in town and her magic isn’t confined to the realm of fantasy” …

Mike Alexander, The Sunday Star Times, New Zealand, Sept 07

Young people are setting and achieving their goals, inspired by an almost unknown book called The Mastery Club, and its heroine, a green-haired girl called Nina.

This award-winning novel for adolescents by Melbourne author, Liliane Grace, draws on timeless philosophies about the creative power of the mind and inspires young people to take responsibility for their lives. It is a veritable treasure chest of life-affirming principles and resources, demonstrating how to set goals, visualise and use affirmations.

Local author says no; there is a Hidden Order.

To most people life looks chaotic and unjust, but local Melbourne author Liliane Grace has just released a book for teens that challenges this view.

Addressing big issues like war and peace, health and illness (including cancer, which is currently affecting/now predicted to affect one in two people), and challenging relationships, her ‘personal development novel’, The Hidden Order – can you see it? presents the idea that life is, in fact, perfectly orderly.

Melbourne, Victoria, Australia - Australian youth are caught up in the worldwide tide of fantasy fiction like Harry Potter, the Twilight Series and The Hunger Games, but how many of them are going to stumble upon a dragon’s egg or have to fight the ‘Forces of Darkness’?

“On the other hand,” Melbourne author Liliane Grace asks, “how many youth could do with some help creating some magic in their own lives – some real magic?”

Fight Club is in the news. It’s a confrontational and violent novel by Chuck Palahniuk about young men who meet to fight and thus formally object to a materialistic, ‘cushy’ world that only offers human warmth to those who are ill. VCE students are currently studying the book and film in Literature classes – a book that makes reference to the ingredients used to produce explosives, and a film that has created a cult following and stimulated youth in the U.S. to form their own fight clubs.

Liliane Grace, Melbourne author of The Mastery Club, questions the value that youth will gain by studying Fight Club and asks parents which sort of Club they would prefer their kids join – a Fight Club or a Mastery Club, in which youth are invited to take responsibility for achieving their goals and dreams? 

SOME KIDS ARE CHOOSING THEIR END OF YEAR SCHOOL RESULTS NOW!

The Mastery Club, by award-winning Melbourne author, Liliane Grace, is encouraging students to decide their end-of-year results RIGHT NOW, and to do so by taking advantage of principles practised in sports psychology for years.

Athletes visualise and mentally rehearse the behaviours they want to produce, and school students can use the same strategies to improve their end-of-year results, enhance friendships, develop new skills and attract new opportunities.

Most people think good school marks are the result of hard work, but the truth is that hard work is not the only key ingredient.